RSSAll Entries Tagged With: "Dr Rob Marshall"

Feeding Exhibition Budgerigars - By Dr Rob Marshall B.V.Sc., M.A.V.C.Sc. (Avian Health)

Feeding Exhibition Budgerigars – By Dr Rob Marshall B.V.Sc., M.A.V.C.Sc. (Avian Health)

Protein additives are necessary for the big bodied, heavy feathered modern day budgerigar.

Share

Cocks unwell and not Hens and Vice Versa

“Going light” – two examples of sound procedural advice on what are mysterious problems for even the most experienced of us.

Share

GSB Q & A – Part 2 – Breeding

The great difficulty in budgerigar breeding is starting them. Think about March as a month. For all my years, breeders have said it is better to start in March. It is of course the increase in light that makes it easier.

Share

Going Light

The item that causes more distress and problems within our aviaries is the matter that we term “Going Light”.

Share

Reducing Stress Due to Transportation

The stresses of long journeys are obvious involving crating, unfamilar noises en route, changes of seed and water on arrival in new premises

Share

Tails You Lose! – Part 3

As readers may already be aware, I am trying to establish if the loss of tail feathers can be attributed to nutrition, feather mite infestation, lice or another unknown cause.

Share

Tail & Wing Butt Cysts

How to deal with cysts on tails and wing butts.

Share

Tail Feather Loss

If you have experienced tail loss and have some reaction, do please add a comment at the end of the article(s). Naturally it is a problem that should be able to be cracked – somebody may even have found a cure to clean up the feather follicle to allow new growth to re-appear. If so, please do contribute.

Share

Tails You Lose! – Part 1

You can breed a super bird with all the right head qualities, depth of mask and so on, until it gets to 5-7 weeks of age and suddenly it loses its tail feathers! It can be earlier or later. The bird is what I have always thought – a borderline French Moult victim. The reasoning is that the tails are the longest feathers in the budgerigar body, and thus require a perfectly nutritious metabolism to sustain these feathers soundly to full growth and permanence, until the first normal moult.

Share

Budgerigar Health Part 5 of 5 – Problem Solving

A systematic physical examination of the sick or dead budgerigar helps reveal more subtle symptoms and improves the accuracy of self-diagnosis, but when in doubt contact your avian veterinarian. Individuals that display distant signs of failing health or disease should be caught and examined more closely in order to identify the exact nature of the health problem.

Share

Budgerigar Health Part 4 of 5 – Medicines

Budgerigars are particularly susceptible to environmental diseases that may cause catastrophic losses and illnesses that affect their wellness and ability to breed. Medicines are needed to cure and prevent these diseases such as coccidiosis, worms, lice and mites.

Share

Megabacterial Infection

Weight loss over a prolonged period is consistent with Megabacterial infection. Megabacteria as a secondary disease related to immune suppression. So we have to look for another primary infection which may be a genetic weakness, but more often inherent Polyomavirus infection and / or stress related psittacosis.

Share

Thanks from Dr Rob Marshall

I think your site will thrust budgerigar breeders into the 21st century and allow them to receive far more success and enjoyment from this entrancing hobby.

Share

Budgerigar Health Part 3 of 5 – Self Diagnosis

For breeders, an ability to detect the first signs of an illness is essential as many budgerigar diseases are rapidly fatal with the best quality show birds often being the first to die. Changes in the behaviour or physical appearance of an individual bird may indicate the beginning of an illness or an inherent weakness. […]

Share

Budgerigar Health Part 2 of 5 – Medicine Selection

Sick birds are given their best chance of being saved by adding an appropriate medicine into the ER/Quik Gel formula and administering it directly by crop needle.

At the same time, whilst waiting for the final outcome of veterinary tests, adding Quik Gel to the drinking water may temporarily protect healthy in-contact birds.

Share

Budgerigar Health Part 1 of 5 – Emergency First Aid

The first response to failing health should be to isolate any sick bird(s) to a hospital cage. The hospital cage should be pre-heated to 25-30 degrees Celsius, possess a perch, fresh seed and have Quik Gel in the drinking water. The floor should be lined with clean paper so that the droppings can be clearly viewed.

Share

Quik Gel

Quik Gel provides an immediate and sustained source of energy to sick birds and is also used during critical times such as breeding. The disinfecting qualities of Quik Gel help protect against the spread of infection.

Quik Gel is a high energy emergency gel also containing vitamins and disinfecting agents. It is used to accelerate recovery from illness and temporarily prevent an infection from worsening while waiting for the results of culture tests. Very sick birds may need crop needle feeding.

Share

Dr Robert Marshall

Any fancier can easily find an emergency solution, via a step-by-step diagnosis of any sick bird, to see exactly the right course to follow and drug(s) to give.

Dr Marshall is also arranging for supplies of the relevant approved drugs to be available within the UK for distribution worldwide.

Share

New Publication “The Budgerigar” by Dr Robert Marshall

Fanciers will have seen a bird(s) with the nostrils within the cere exuding a fluid. This is often associated with darkened feathers immediately above the cere. The fluid can also possess a foul smell. At the same time, the nostrils can be seen to be closing as the fluid slowly hardens around the nasal apertures.

Share